Equipment Testing and Certification
Equipment Testing & Certification
History and Timeline
Northern Strands provides an extensive rigging recertification program which includes tracking and identifying rigging equipment that needs to be inspected and recertified. Rigging equipment that needs to be recertified and inspected are visually and dimensionally checked as well as proof loaded in our test bed which provides a certificate of testing on the rigging item tested. We have a horizontal test bed capable of pulling up to 400,000 lbs and our vertical test bed capable of 50,000 lbs.

Wire rope slings, web slings, round slings, lifting chain slings, shackles, chain hoists and lever hoists are examples of rigging that needs to be recertified frequently to avoid unexpected rigging failure. Rigging take on a lot of stress and lifts heavy loads day in and day out. For this reason, rigging equipment needs to be professionally inspected in regular intervals to maintain safety on the job site and Northern Strands provides this solution.

Northern Strands can provide video documentation. As seen in the picture below.

Equipment Testing & Certification


On Site Service

To support our rigging inspectors Northern Strands has a Mobile Test Bed that we can use for on-site pull testing when needed. Our Mobile Test Bed has the largest W.L.L. of any Mobile Test Bed in Canada, at 200,000 lbs. We can provide personnel to help identify rigging items that need to be inspected and recertified on site. Northern Strands mobile test bed and our competent inspectors can be brought to any site for rigging recertification and testing.

We have the ability to repair, pull test, restore and recertify many types of equipment, such as:
  • Material baskets
  • Lifting beams
  • Man baskets
  • Wire rope slings
  • Web slings
  • Round slings
  • Wire rope sockets
  • Chase blocks
  • Hydraulic linkage
  • Attachment pins
  • Thimble cappels
  • D-plates
  • Spreader beams

Our testing, certification and recertification capacities and abilities:
  • Pull testing
  • Pull testing to destruction
  • Rigging inspections and testing
  • Research & development

Is Your Rigging Safe Demonstration/Seminar

One of the most commonly asked questions about rigging we receive, "How do I know if my rigging is defective or needs to be replaced?" or, "How do I inspect my rigging and be able to tell when I need to replace it?". These are great questions! These types of questions are what led to Northern Strands developing the, "Is Your Rigging Safe Demonstration/Seminar". We have seen the need for constant reminders and clarification when discussing safe rigging practices and inspections. To fill that need, Northern Strands has developed a unique mobile rigging demonstration equipped with a pull test bed and all necessary equipment to discuss and demonstration the importance of rigging safely.

In this seminar we try and answer the following questions:
  1. Is your rigging meeting the required Safety factor for overhead lifting?
  2. Do you ever wonder if the lifting equipment you are using is safe?
  3. Have you ever seen what overloading can do to the Working load limit?
  4. Have you ever seen what weld splatter can do to the Working load limit?
  5. Have you ever seen what your working environment can do to the Working load limit?
  6. Do you know how your lifting application affects the safe Working load?
  7. Are you familiar with the OH and S regulations for rigging?
We also stress in this seminar the importance of daily inspections and key in on things to look for. Finally, we talk about safe rigging practices, we highlight how working load limits are changed by the manner in which you lift the material. IE. (straight lift 90 degree, Basket, choker). All of this includes actual examples that are simulated with our mobile test bed.

Rigging Regulations

OH&A Reg 229 States:
"An employer or contractor shall ensure that all rigging and components of rigging are inspected thoroughly at appropriate intervals and visually inspected before use to ensure that the rigging and rigging components will safety perform the intended function of the rigging and rigging components."

OH&A Reg 229 States:
216(1) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a hoist, crane, or lifting device is inspected by a competent person to determine whether the hoist, crane of lifting device is in a safe working condition.
Employers and Employees shall follow the guidelines set forth by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). ASME B30.9 covers wire rope slings, chain slings, web slings or synthetic slings and round slings. ASME B30.20 covers below the hook lifting devices such as spreader bars, spreader beams, lifting magnets, vacuum lifters, tirfors, lever hoists (pullers), manual hoists (Chain fall), and plate clamps.
Within the ASME standards it states that all lifting equipment shall undergo a periodic inspection at a minimum of at least once a year. Periodic inspections may be required could be more frequent depending on the duty cycle of the equipment

Slings Cable

ASME B30.9 (2003)
9-2.1 (Training)
Wire rope sling users shall be trained in selection, inspection, cautions to personnel effects of environment and rigging practices (see section 9-0.2 for definitions) designated person, qualified person.
9-2.7.2 (Initial)
Sling identification shall be done by the sling manufacturer.
9-2.7.3
Sling identification should be maintained by the user so as to be legible during sling life.
9-2.7.4
Replacement of sling I.D. tag shall be considered a repair as specified in paras. 9-2.9.5 (a) and (b).
Additional proof loading is not required unless it is deemed necessary by competent person.
9-2.9.4
A wire rope sling shall be removed from service if I.D. tag is missing or illegible.
9-2.9.5 (Repair)
Sling shall be repaired only by sling manufacturer or qualified person. Repaired sling shall be marked to identify the repairing agency.
9-2.7.1 (Tagging)
Each sling must be marked to show:
  • Name or trademark of manufacturer.
  • Rated loads for types of hitches and angles.
  • Diameter or size.

Slings Web

ASME B30.9 (2003)
9-5.7.2 (Initial)
All synthetic web slings shall have identification tag done by sling manufacturer.
Sling I.D. tag should be maintained by the user so as to be legible and intact during life of sling.
Replacement of Sling I.D. tag shall be considered a repair as specified in paras. 9-5.9.5 (a) and (b).
Additional proof loading is not required unless deemed necessary by competent person.
9-5.9.4 (Removal)
A synthetic web sling shall be removed from service if missing or illegible tag.
9-5.9.5 (Repair)
Slings shall be repaired only by sling manufacturer or qualified person. Repaired sling shall be marked to identify the repairing agency.
9-5.7.1 (Tagging)
Each sling should be marked to show:
  • Name or trademark of manufacturer.
  • Manufacturer code or stock number.
  • Rated loads for types of hitches used and angle upon which it is based.
  • Type of synthetic material.

Web Sling and Tie Down Assoc.

5.0 (Section)
5.3 (Environmental conditions)
5.3.5 (Sunlight or ultra violet light)
Environments in which web slings are continuously exposed to ultra violet light can affect the strength of synthetic web slings in varying degrees from slight to total degradation.
*Note
Web Slings that have a degradation of coating applied at time of manufacture, severe abrasion, or have no initial coating (white slings) are susceptible to water absorption by the nylon fibers. Water absorption reduces breaking strength quite dramatically and also increases elongation substantially. This action of water retention can greatly affect W.L.L.
5.3.5 (Caution)
Section (d) has a caution
Slings used in environments where they are subject to continuous exposure to sunlight or ultra violet light shall be proof tested to twice the rated capacity semi-annually or more frequently depending on severity of exposure.

Round Slings

ASME B30.9 (2003)
9-6 (Section)
9-6.7.2 (Initial)
Sling shall have I.D. tag done by the manufacturer.
9-6.7.3
Sling I.D. tag should be maintained by the user so as to be legible during the life of the sling.
9-6.7.4
Replacement of sling tag shall be considered a repair as specified in paras. 9-6.9.5 (a) and (b).
9-6.9.5 (Repair)
Slings should be repaired only by the sling manufacturer or qualified person. Repaired sling shall be marked to identify the repairing agency.
9-5.7.1 (Tagging)
Each sling shall be marked to show:
  • Name or trademark of manufacturer.
  • Manufacturer code or stock number.
  • Rated loads for types of hitches used and the angle upon which it is based.
  • Cover material.
  • Core material (if different from cover material).

Web Sling + Tie Down Assoc.

2.9 (Section) Polyester Round Slings
2.9.1
Polyester Round Slings protective covers should be color coded to correspond with the rated capacity. Always check the I.D. tag to determine if the polyester round sling's rated capacity is applicable for the lift.
*Caution
Color codes may vary along with capacities from various manufacturers. Always check I.D. tag to determine if rated capacity is applicable for lift.
Occupational Health & Safety
Section 231 (2) (a)
An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a sling is clearly labeled to indicate the sling’s maximum load or the sling’s maximum load is made readily available to workers.

Removal Criteria

Cable Slings
  • Excessive broken wires
    • 10 broken wires randomly distributed in one rope lay (7-8 rope diameters).
    • 5 broken wires randomly distributed in one strand in one rope lay (7-8 rope diameters).
  • Severe localized abrasion.
  • Kinking, crushing, birdcaging.
  • And damage to rope’s original structure.
  • Corrosion of rope or end attachments.
Web Slings
  • Acid or caustic burns.
  • Melting on any part of sling.
  • Holes, tears, cuts, or snags.
  • Broken or torn stitching in load bearing splices.
  • Excessive abrasion.
  • Discoloration, brittle or stiff areas on any part of the sling, which may mean chemical or ultra violet damage.
  • Evidence of heat damage.
Round Slings
  • Acid or caustic burns.
  • Evidence of heat damage.
  • Holes, tears, cuts, abrasive wear, or snags that expose the core yarns.
  • Broken or damaged core yarns.
  • Weld splatter that exposes core yarns.
  • Discoloration and brittle or stiff areas on any part of the sling which may mean chemical or other damage.

Wire Rope & Rigging

Paul Grainger - Sales Manager
Email: sales@northernstrands.com
Saskatoon: (306) 242-7073, Regina: (306) 352-7073
Cell: (306) 381-7725
Fax: (306) 249-4374
Email: pgrainger@northernstrands.com

Jared Huculak - Outside Sales - Regina Branch
Email: jhuculak@northernstrands.com
Phone: (306) 352-7073
Cell: (306) 531-8825
Fax: (306) 352-9112

Colin Melrose - Outside Sales - Saskatoon Branch
Phone: (306) 242-7073
Cell: (306) 491-9377
Fax: (306) 249-4374
Email: cmelrose@northernstrands.com

Saskatoon (Head Office)

  • 3235 Millar Avenue
  • Saskatoon, SK S7K 5Y3

Regina

  • 125 Henderson Drive
  • Regina, SK S4N 5W4
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