Northern Strands
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Latest News

Northern Strands Develops Cutting Edge Grain Bin Fall Protection System

This fall protection system is a cutting edge product designed to protect farm workers from a fall while climbing or accessing a bin for repairs or inspections. In today’s world, worker/farmer safety has never been more emphasized and important than it is right now. At Northern Strands we believe serious injuries are preventable and avoidable with proper planning and systems in place. It is with this belief in mind that Northern Strands accepted the challenge of making grain bin inspections and repairs more safe by developing a fall protection system. When properly installed and used, our system will prevent a person from falling off a grain bin and impacting the ground or falling into the bottom of a grain bin and suffocating. Currently this system is compatible with the Westor and Westeel 1805 bins. Northern Strands is working on Fall Protection Systems that will work for other models of grain bins.

The launch for this new Grain Bin System is happening at AG in Motion Tuesday July 18, 2017 - Thursday July 20, 2017. AG in Motion is just 15 mins NW of Saskatoon on Hwy 16 at Range Road 3083. Northern Strands will be at Booth Space 420. There will be demos throughout the week.

Contact the Northern Strands Fall Protection Division today to find out more about Farm Safety. The Engineered Fall Protection Division offers a variety of fall protection systems, solutions and services. Custom-engineered solutions can be designed to suit specific requirements. Services and equipment include: inspection and replacement services for overhead and vertical lifelines, consulting, supply and installation services for single point anchors, guardrail systems, walkways, platforms and structural assessments.


Phone 306-242-7073
email lifelines@northernstrands.com
Website http://www.northernstrands.com/fall-protection.aspx

Grain bin anchor fall protection system brochure.docx.pdf (502.2KB)

OH&S Fall Protection Regulations In Saskatchewan

Did you know that violations of fall protection regulations can result in personnel and company fines in the range of thousands of dollars? Or that injuries or deaths resulting from fall protection violations can result in legal action and cost companies tens of thousands of dollars? Recently one such story was published by CBC Saskatchewan http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/safety-violation-saskatchewan-employer-occupational-health-1.4030827 Thankfully, more companies than not are now taking fall protection very seriously in Saskatchewan, and Northern Strands is here to help!

Our Northern Strands Fall Protection Division is often asked, "What are the OH&S regulations regarding fall arrest personnel protective equipment and general fall protection in Saskatchewan?" Or the similar question, "What are the roof fall protection requirements in Saskatchewan?" For the convenience of our customers and clients we have posted the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations relating to fall arrest personnel protective equipment and fall protection in the second half of this blog...

Additional fall protection questions Northern Strands Fall Protection is regularly asked, "What are my responsibilities as an employer? What kind of fall protection plan do I need and how to I implement it?" These are all very good questions that we are more than happy to answer. However the answers can potentially vary depending on the situation. In most cases our Fall Protection Team will need to visit the site to perform an assessment and provide a recommendation or quote. 

Contact the Northern Strands Fall Protection Division today to find out more about OH&S fall protection regulations in Saskatchewan by requesting an assessment. We specialize in the design and installation of roof fall protection systems.

Phone 306-242-7073

email lifelines@northernstrands.com

Website http://www.northernstrands.com/fall-protection.aspx

Northern Strands Fall Protection Brochure Northern Strands Fall Protection Brochure email.pdf (767.4KB) 



"SASKATCHEWAN REGULATION O-1.1 Reg 1 (1996)

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations

under the

The Occupational Health and Safety Act

As Amended by:

Saskatchewan Regulations 6/97, 35/2003 and 112/2005

Note: This is not the official version.We do not guarantee the accuracy of the OH&S regulations that have been extracted and posted in this blog. We recommend verifying all information by visiting the Government of Saskatchewan's website and the viewing the official OH&S Regulations document http://www.qp.gov.sk.ca/documents/English/Regulations/Regulations/O1-1R1.pdf


“OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY, 1996

O-1.1 REG 1


Lifelines

101(1) Unless otherwise specifically provided, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a lifeline:

(c) is suitable for the conditions in which the lifeline is to be used, having regard to factors including strength, abrasion resistance, extensibility and chemical stability;

(d) is made of wire rope or synthetic material;

(e) is free of imperfections, knots and splices, other than end terminations;

(f) is protected by padding where the lifeline passes over sharp edges;

(g) is protected from heat, flame or abrasive or corrosive materials during use;

(h) is fastened to a secure anchor point that:

has a breaking strength of at least 22.2 kilonewtons; and

is not used to suspend any platform or other load; and

(i) is maintained according to the manufacturer’s recommendation.

(1.1) Unless otherwise specifically provided, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that there is a lifeline that meets the requirements of this section for every worker.

(2) Unless otherwise specifically provided, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a vertical lifeline required by these regulations has a minimum diameter of:

(a) 12 millimetres if the lifeline is made of nylon;

(b) 15 millimetres if the lifeline is made of polypropylene; or

(c) eight millimetres if the lifeline is made of wire rope.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that where a vertical lifeline is used:

(a) the lower end extends to the ground or to a safe landing; and

(b) the lifeline is protected at the lower end to ensure that the line cannot be

fouled by any equipment.

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY, 1996

60

O-1.1 REG 1

(4) Unless otherwise specifically provided, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a horizontal lifeline is:

(a) either:

(i) designed and certified as safe by a professional engineer; or

(ii) manufactured to an approved standard; and

(b) installed and used in accordance with the design mentioned in clause (a) or the manufacturer’s recommendations.

4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s102; 10 Aug 2007 SR

67/2007 s7; 21 Sep 2007 SR 91/2007 s3.


Personal fall arrest systems

102(1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a personal fall arrest system and connecting linkage required by these regulations are approved and maintained.

(j) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a personal fall arrest system required by these regulations:

prevents a worker from falling more than 1.2 metres without a shock absorber;

where a shock absorber is used, prevents a worker from falling more than two metres or the limit specified in the manufacturer’s specifications, whichever is less;

applies a peak fall-arrest force not greater than eight kilonewtons to a worker; and

is fastened to a lifeline or to a secure anchor point that has a breaking strength of at least 22.2 kilonewtons.


10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s8.


Full-body harness

103 Where a full-body harness is used, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(4) the full-body harness and connecting linkage are approved and maintained;

(5) the full-body harness is properly fitted to the worker;

(6) the worker is trained in the safe use of the full-body harness;

(7) all metal parts of the full-body harness and connecting linkage are of drop-forged steel 22.2 kilonewtons proof tested;

(8) a protective thimble is used to protect ropes or straps from chafing whenever a rope or strap is connected to an eye or a D-ring used in the full- body harness or connecting linkage; and

(9) the connecting linkage is attached to a personal fall arrest system, lifeline or secure anchor point to prevent the worker from falling more than 1.2 metres.

10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s8.

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY, 1996

61

O-1.1 REG 1

Snap hooks on personal fall arrest system

(k) Where a snap hook is used as an integral component of a personal fall arrest system, connecting linkage, full-body harness or lifeline, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the snap hook is self-locking and is approved and maintained.

10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s8.


Lanyards

(l) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a lanyard:

is as short as work conditions permit;

is constructed of:

nylon, polyester or polypropylene rope or webbing; or

wire rope that is equipped with an approved shock absorbing device;

is equipped with suitable snap hooks; and

is approved and maintained.


4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s105.


Workers’ responsibilities re lifelines, etc.

106(1) Before using a lifeline or lanyard, a worker shall ensure that the lifeline or lanyard:

(10) is free of imperfections, knots and splices, other than end terminations;

(11) is protected by padding where the lifeline or lanyard passes over sharp edges; and

(12) is protected from heat, flame or abrasive or corrosive materials during use.

(2) Before using a vertical lifeline, a worker shall ensure that:

(a) the lower end extends to the ground or to a safe landing; and

(b) the lifeline is protected at the lower end to ensure that the line cannot be fouled by any equipment.

(3) Before using a full-body harness, a worker shall ensure that the full-body harness:

(a) is properly adjusted to fit the worker securely; and

(b) subject to subsection 274(5), is attached by means of a connecting linkage to a fixed anchor or a lifeline.

(4) A worker who uses a full-body harness and connecting linkage shall ensure that the connecting linkage is attached to a personal fall arrest system, lifeline or a fixed anchor.


4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s106; 10 Aug 2007 SR

67/2007 s9.


OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY, 1996

62

O-1.1 REG 1

Inspection of full body harness, etc.

107(1) Where the use of a connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline is required by these regulations, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a competent person:

(13) inspects or contractor shall ensure that a worker inspects the connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline before each use and that where a defect or unsafe condition that may create a hazard to a worker is identified in a connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline:

(a) steps are taken immediately to protect the health and safety of any worker who may be at risk until the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected; and

(b) as soon as is reasonably practicable, the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected.



10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s10.


Protection against drowning

108(1) In this section:

(5) “buoyant apparatus” means a device that is capable of supporting the weight in water of a worker and that is constructed to:

(a) remain stable when floating on either side;

(b) have no projections that would prevent the buoyant apparatus from sliding easily over the side of a boat or ship; and

(c) require no adjustment before use;

(6) “life jacket” means an approved device that is capable of keeping a worker’s head above water in a face-up position without effort by the worker;

(7) “personal flotation device” means an approved device that is capable of keeping a worker’s head above water without effort by the worker, and

includes a device that is designed to protect a worker against hypothermia.


OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY, 1996

63

O-1.1 REG 1

(2) Where a worker is required to work at a place from which the worker could fall and drown, and the worker is not protected by a guardrail, an employer or contractor shall:


(m) provide the worker with a life jacket and ensure that the worker uses it, and ensure that the rescue equipment and personnel described in subsection (3) are readily available;

(n) provide the worker with a full-body harness and lifeline and ensure that the worker uses them; or

(o) ensure that a net is installed that is capable of safely catching the worker if the worker falls.

(14) The rescue equipment and personnel required by clause (2)(a) must consist of:

(a) a suitable boat equipped with a boat hook;

(b) a buoyant apparatus attached to a nylon rope that is not less than nine millimetres in diameter and not less than 15 metres long; and

(c) a sufficient number of properly equipped and trained workers to implement rescue procedures.

(15) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a life jacket or personal flotation device is provided for each worker who is transported by boat or works from a boat, and that each worker uses the life jacket or personal flotation device at all times when the worker is in the boat.


4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s108.


PART IX

Safeguards, Storage, Warning Signs and Signals


Interpretation

115 In this Part, “toeboard” means a low vertical guard that is located at the outer edge of a platform, scaffold, floor, stair or walkway and that is designed to prevent materials or equipment from falling over the edge.

4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s115.


Protection against falling

116(1) In this section and sections 116.1 to 116.3:

(a) “anchor point” or “anchor plate” means a secure connecting point capable of safely withstanding the impact forces applied by a fall protection system;

(b) “control zone” means the area within two metres of an unguarded edge of a level, elevated work surface of three metres or more in height;

(c) “fall protection system” means:

a control zone as required pursuant to section 116.2;

a personal fall arrest system;

a safety net; or

(iv) a travel restraint system;

(d) “permanent” means intended and designed to last indefinitely;

(e) “similar barrier” means any barrier that the employer or contractor can demonstrate provides a level of protection that is at least equivalent to a guardrail;

(f) “temporary” means:

designed to be removed by the last workers using it before commissioning or turnover to the contractor or owner; and

intended and designed to last not more than one year;

(g) “travel restraint system” means a system that prevents a worker from travelling to the edge of a structure or to a work position from which the worker could fall.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that workers use a fall protection system at a temporary or permanent work area where:

(a) a worker may fall three metres or more; or

(b) there is a possibility of injury if a worker falls less than three metres.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker at a permanent work area is protected from falling by a guardrail or similar barrier if the worker may fall a vertical distance of more than 1.2 metres and less than three metres.

(4) Notwithstanding subsection (3), where the use of a guardrail or similar barrier is not reasonably practicable, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker uses a travel restraint system.

(5) Notwithstanding subsection (4), where the use of a travel restraint system is not reasonably practicable, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a safety net or control zone or other equally effective means that protects the worker from falling is used.

(6) Subsection (2) does not apply to competent workers who are engaged in:

(a) connecting the structural members of a skeletal steel structure or a pre-cast structure;

(2) connecting the support structure of a scaffold;

(3) stabilizing or securing the load on a truck or trailer;

(2) installing or attaching a fall protection system to the anchor point;

(3) removing or disassembling the associated parts of a fall protection system when it is no longer required; or

(4) activities within the normal course of business on a permanent loading dock that is not greater than 1.2 metres in height.

10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s11.


Fall protection plan

116.1(1) An employer or contractor shall develop a written fall protection plan where:

(h) a worker may fall three metres or more; and

(i) workers are not protected by a guardrail or similar barrier.

(7) The fall protection plan required by subsection (1) must describe:

(a) the fall hazards at the worksite;

(b) the fall protection system to be used at the worksite;

(c) the procedures used to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble the fall protection system; and

(d) the rescue procedures to be used if a worker falls, is suspended by a personal fall arrest system or safety net and needs to be rescued.

(8) The employer or contractor shall ensure that a copy of the fall protection plan is readily available before work begins at a worksite where a risk of falling exists.

(9) The employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker is trained in the fall protection plan and the safe use of the fall protection system before allowing the worker to work in an area where a fall protection system must be used.

10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s11.


Control zone

116.2(1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a control zone:

(a) is only used if a worker can fall from a level surface in a work area; and

(b) is not less than two metres wide when measured from the unguarded edge.

(4) When crossing a control zone mentioned in subsection (1), a worker:

(a) subject to subsection (4) is not required to use a fall protection system, other than the control zone, to enter or leave the work area; and

(b) shall follow the most direct route to get to or from the unguarded edge.

(5) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a control zone is clearly marked with an effective raised warning line or other equally effective method if a worker is working more than two metres from an unguarded edge.

(6) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker who has to work within a control zone uses:

(a) a travel restraint system; or

(b) a means that is as equally effective as a travel restraint system and that prevents the worker from getting to the unguarded edge.

10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s11.


Anchor Points and Anchor Plates

116.3(1) Where a worker uses a personal fall arrest system or a travel restraint system, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that an anchor point or anchor plate that meets the requirements of this section is used as part of that system.

(j) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a temporary anchor point used in a travel restraint system:

has an ultimate load capacity of at least 3.5 kilonewtons (800 pounds-force) per worker attached in any direction in which the load may be applied;

is installed and used according to the manufacturer’s specifications;

is permanently marked as being for travel restraint only; and

is removed by the last worker from use on the earlier of:

the date the work project for which it is intended is completed; and

the time specified by the manufacturer.

(k) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a permanent anchor point used in a travel restraint system associated with any new construction project on or after the date this section comes into force:

has an ultimate load capacity of at least 8.75 kilonewtons (2 000 pounds-force) per worker attached in any direction in which the load may be applied;

is installed and used according to the manufacturer’s specifications; and

is permanently marked as being for travel restraint only.

(l) In the case of a personal fall arrest system installed on or after one year after the date this section comes into force, an employer, contractor, owner or supplier shall ensure that anchor points to which the personal fall arrest system is attached have an ultimate load capacity of at least 22.2 kilonewtons (5000 pounds-force) per worker attached in any direction in which the load may be applied.

(m) An employer, contractor, owner or supplier shall ensure that the following types of equipment that are components of fall protection systems, and their installation, conform to the manufacturer’s specifications or are certified by a professional engineer:

permanent anchor points;

(10) anchors with multiple attachment points;

(11) permanent horizontal lifeline systems;

(12) support structures for safety nets.

10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s11.


Elevated conveyors

(n) Where an elevated conveyor crosses over a place where a worker may pass or work, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that suitable precautions are taken to prevent materials on the conveyor from falling on the worker.

4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s117.


Wire mesh

(o) Where wire mesh is required by these regulations, the wire mesh must:

be made from wire that is at least 1.6 millimetres in diameter; and

have a mesh size that is not greater than 40 millimetres by 40 millimetres.

4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s118.


Protection against falling objects

119(1) Subject to section 120, where a worker is required to work in an area where the worker may be in danger from a falling object, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the worker is adequately protected by the installation of an overhead barrier.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that every area where a worker could be struck by a falling object is clearly marked by barriers, notices, warning lights or other warning devices.


4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s119.


Protection from objects falling from scaffolds, etc.

120(1) Where a suspended scaffold, suspended powered scaffold or load-carrying unit is suspended from or attached to a structure, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that wire mesh, or other material equally effective to prevent objects from falling from the working surface, is installed from the working surface to a height of at least 900 millimetres on all sides except the side adjacent to the structure.

(13) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that wire mesh is installed from the working surface of a platform to a height of two metres on all sides of:

(a) a tower hoist as defined in section 199;

(7) a building shaft hoist; and

(8) a hoist cage in an excavated shaft.

(3) Where it is necessary to hoist or lower materials that are of such a nature that the sides of a cantilever hoist platform or skip cannot be equipped as required by subsection (1), an employer, contractor or owner shall provide another equally

effective means for the protection of workers against falling materials.

(p) Where it is necessary for workers to pass through a safeguard required by this section, an employer, contractor or owner shall install a gate that is equally effective to prevent objects from falling from the working surface and shall ensure that the gate is kept closed except when the gate is in use.

4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s120.


Handrails

121(1) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a stairway with five or more treads:

is equipped with a handrail that:

(14) extends the entire length of the stairway;

(15) is adequately secured to the structure;

(9) is installed on the stairway at a height of between 800 and 920 millimetres above the front edge of the treads; and

(10) is strong enough to support a worker who falls on the stairway; and

(b) on an open side, is equipped with both a handrail and an intermediate rail or equivalent safeguard.

(5) Where a handrail is required for a temporary stairway to which subsection (1) applies, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the handrail is constructed of at least 38 by 89 millimetre construction grade lumber, or material of equivalent strength, and is supported by posts that are not more than three metres apart.

4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s121.


Guardrails

122(1) Subject to subsections (2) to (4), where the installation of a guardrail is required by these regulations, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the guardrail:

(a) has a horizontal top member that is not less than 920 millimetres and not more than 1070 millimetres above the working surface;

(b) has a horizontal intermediate member that is spaced midway between the horizontal top member and the working surface;

(c) is supported for the entire length of the guardrail by vertical members that are:

(i) not more than three metres apart, in the case of a guardrail installed before the coming into force of this section; and

(ii) where reasonably practicable, not more than 2.4 metres apart, in the case of a guardrail installed on or after the coming into force of this section;

(d) is capable of supporting a worker who may fall against the guardrail; and

(e) is constructed of 38 by 89 millimetre construction grade lumber or other

materials that are of equal or greater strength.

(2) Clause (1)(a) does not apply to a guardrail that:

(q) was installed on or before October 30, 1988; and

(r) is not less than 900 millimetres nor more than one metre above the working surface.

(16) A horizontal intermediate member is not required in the case of a temporary guardrail that is manufactured with a substantial barrier completely filling the area enclosed by the horizontal top member, a horizontal bottom member and the vertical members.

(17) A wire rope guardrail may be used at the external perimeter of a building under construction.

(18) Where a wire rope guardrail is used pursuant to subsection (4), an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the guardrail consists of a horizontal top member and a horizontal intermediate member made of wire rope that is not less than 9.5 millimetres in diameter, with vertical separators not less than 50 millimetres wide that are spaced at intervals not exceeding 2.4 metres;

(b) the horizontal top member and horizontal intermediate member are positioned above the working surface in accordance with clauses (1)(a) and (b);

(c) the guardrail is kept taut by means of a turnbuckle or other appropriate device; and

(d) the guardrail is arranged so that a worker coming into contact with the ropes cannot fall through the ropes.

(19) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that no worker hangs equipment on a guardrail.


4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s122.


Toeboards

123(1) An employer, contractor or owner shall provide toeboards at the edge of:

(11) a permanent floor, platform, mezzanine, walkway, ramp, runway or other surface from which it is possible for materials to fall more than 1.2 metres;

(12) a temporary scaffold or work platform from which it is possible for materials to fall more than three metres; and

(13) a pit for a flywheel or pulley.

(6) Subsection (1) does not apply to a loading or unloading area if the employer, contractor or owner has taken other precautions to ensure that materials will not fall from the floor or other horizontal surface.

(7) Where a toeboard is required by these regulations, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the toeboard extends from the floor or other horizontal surface to a height of not less than:

(a) 125 millimetres from the floor or surface; or

(b) 100 millimetres from the floor or surface, in the case of a toeboard that was installed before March 13, 1986.

4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s123.

Openings in floors, roofs, etc.

124(1) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that any opening or hole in a floor, roof or other work surface into which a worker could step or fall is:

(s) covered with a securely installed covering that is capable of supporting a load of 360 kilograms per square metre and that is provided with a warning sign or permanent marking clearly indicating the nature of the hazard; or

(t) provided with a guardrail and a toeboard.

(2) Where the covering or guardrail and toeboard mentioned in subsection (1) or any part of the guardrail or toeboard is removed for any reason, an employer, contractor or owner shall immediately provide an effective alternative means of protection.

4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s124.


Building shafts

125(1) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a work platform that is an integral part of a slip form used in a building shaft is designed by a professional engineer to withstand the maximum foreseeable load and is constructed, erected and used in accordance with that design.

(20) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a platform mentioned in subsection (1) that has been moved is examined by a competent person and that a written report of the examination is made by the person who carried it out and kept by the employer, contractor or owner.

(21) An employer, contractor or owner shall not require or permit a worker to work on a platform mentioned in subsection (1) that has been moved before the platform has been examined in accordance with subsection (2), unless the worker is using a personal fall arrest system, a full-body harness, a lanyard or a lifeline that meets the requirements of Part VII.

(22) Where there is no work platform installed at the level of a doorway or opening in a building shaft, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the doorway or opening is covered by a solid barrier that extends from the bottom of the doorway or opening to a height of at least two metres and is capable of preventing a worker or loose material from falling down the shaft.

(23) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that at least one warning sign indicating the presence of an open building shaft is placed on a barrier erected pursuant to subsection (4).


4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s125; 10 Aug 2007 SR

67/2007 s12.


Safety nets

126 Where a safety net is required by these regulations, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the safety net:

(14) is manufactured from rope that is at least:

(a) eight millimetres in diameter; and

(ii) equivalent in breaking strength to number one grade pure manilla

rope nine millimetres in diameter;


(u) has a mesh size that is not greater than 150 by 150 millimetres;

(v) has safety hooks or shackles of drop-forged steel that is 22.2 kilonewtons proof tested;

(w) has joints between the net panels that are equal in strength to the net;

(x) extends at least two metres beyond, and is not more than six metres below, the work area; and

(y) is installed and maintained so that, at the maximum deflection of the net when arresting the fall of a worker, no portion of the net contacts another surface.


4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s126; 10 Aug 2007 SR

67/2007 s13.


Storage tanks

127(1) Where a worker is regularly required to walk or work on top of a storage tank, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the storage tank is fitted with a permanent walkway with guardrails.

(2) Where a worker is required to walk or work on top of a storage tank, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that any opening in the tank into which a worker may fall is guarded by a grid or other suitable means to prevent the worker from falling into the tank.

4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s127."


Design, Installation, and Maintenance of Permanent Rooftop Anchors in Saskatchewan

The emphasis and scrutiny on safety in the workplace is increasing every day, and although significant advancements have been made in the field of fall protection, Canada (and specifically, Saskatchewan) still lags behind our neighbors in the US and significantly lags behind many European countries. One area of fall protection that is often misunderstood and overlooked is the design, installation, and maintenance of permanent roof top anchors.

Saskatchewan OH&S regulations require fall protection to be present anytime a worker could fall 3m or more. This means that most buildings could benefit from having permanent roof top anchors for workers to tie to while working near the leading edge. Furthermore, many multi-story buildings require rooftop anchors to allow for window washing and maintenance. It is important to consider the need for these anchors during the design phase of new buildings. The cost of installing these anchors during a new build, when structural members are exposed and accessible is significantly lower than having to open up a sealed roofing system to install them once the building is completed. So, what do designers, owners, and users need to know about permanent rooftop anchors?

According to the Saskatchewan OH&S regulations, a permanent rooftop anchor must have an ultimate load capacity of at least 22.2 kN (5000 lbs). Given this requirement, most of the anchors on the market are rated for at least 5000 lbs, so why is it even important to be aware of this requirement? Although the anchor itself might be rated for 5000 lbs, the substrate that it is fastened to and the fasteners themselves must also be capable of supporting a 5000 lb load. With the ever increasing liability placed on owners and designers, this means that it is always a good idea to have a professional engineer review the design prior to installation. The best resource for fall protection engineers is the CSA standards, and any engineer who is designing a permanent rooftop anchor should have in-depth knowledge of CSA Z259.16 (“Design of Active Fall Protection Systems”). For anchors intended for suspended access, CSA Z271 (“Safety Code for Suspended Platforms”) is a terrific resource.

In regards to installation, permanent rooftop anchors should be installed as per the manufacturer or supervising engineer’s instructions and should always be installed by competent workers who have experience with fall protection systems. CSA fall protection standards are unique in that they require sealed as-built drawings, which is meant to ensure that the certifying engineer is involved throughout the entire project and properly reviews the installation once completed.

Once the anchors are installed, it is important that they are maintained properly. All permanent roof top anchors should be inspected at least annually by a professional engineer or a qualified person under the supervision of an engineer. It is important for building owners to ensure that these inspections are carried out each year to keep users safe and to limit liability.

As awareness of fall protection increases throughout the province and country, Northern Strands is here to provide our industry-leading expertise and exceptional customer service to ensure that everyone goes home safe at the end of the work day.

Contact us to learn more about engineered fall protection systems.  
Phone 306-242-7073
Email lifelines@northernstrands.com 

Construction Company Fall Protection Plan. Do You Need One?

The curious thing about fall protection used by most construction companies today is that a great while a great many of us know that it is currently workplace law in the province of Saskatchewan to wear a full-body harness when working at heights, we fail to realize that there is often more to consider.

We might also know that the soles of our feet need to be over the 3m/10’ threshold before it becomes law to use fall protection on non-permanent work areas, but what many of us do not realize is that the law also states that a fall protection plan is in place under these very same circumstances.

Furthermore, the law sets out what this fall protection program has to cover:

  • The fall hazards at the work site
  • The fall protection system to be used at the worksite
  • The procedures used to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble the fall protection system
  • AND, the rescue procedures to be used if a worker falls, is suspended by a personal fall arrest system or safety net and needs to be rescued.

A copy of this written documents must be readily available before work begins at a worksite where a risk of falling exists and the employer is responsible to ensure that all workers are trained in the fall protection plan and safe use of the fall protection system before allowing the worker to work in an area where a fall protection system must be used.

All of this information can be found in section 116.1 of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 1996 and if you happen to find yourself working at heights without an adequate fall protection or rescue plan you should also look at section 3-31 of the Saskatchewan Employment Act which states:

“A worker may refuse to perform any particular act or series of acts at a place of employment if the worker has reasonable grounds to believe that the act or series of acts is unusually dangerous to the worker’s health or safety or the health or safety of any other person at the place of employment…”

If you need help writing up a fall protection program for your construction company, contact us. Our head trainer will help get you pointed in the right direction and can provide fall protection plan templates on request.

Northern Strands currently offers a number of Safety Training Courses:
  • Fall Arrest
  • First Aid / CPR
  • Tugger Safety
  • Wirelock® Socketing
  • Crosby® Rigging
  • Suspended Access Equipment
  • Emergency Medical Responder Program
  • Medical First Responder Program
  • Intermediate Level First Aid Training
  • Firefighter Advanced First Aid
We also have industry specific Safety Training programs for:
  • Construction Training
  • Mining Training
  • Emergency Responder Training
Our Trainers are some of the most qualified and recognized Safety Trainers in all of Saskatchewan. Our Safety Trainers have taken, "Train the Trainer courses" and have trained Safety Trainers for other Safety Training Companies

If you want to learn from the best, book your training with Northern Strands. 

Contact us at
training@northernstrands.com  
306-242-7073

Fall Protection Anchor Point Attachments

There are many different methods of attaching an anchor point to a structure in order to use the anchor for fall protection.  Determining the method of fall protection anchor installation should be done by a qualified engineer.

In section 116 of the OH&S fall protection regulations it states that “ an Anchor point or Anchor plate means a secure connecting point capable of safely withstanding the impact forces applied by a fall protection system”.

It is extremely important that the structure we are attaching our fall protection anchors to is strong enough to handle the loads implied in the case of a fall.  It is great to be tied off, but if what we are tying off to isn’t strong enough to hold the worker bad things can happen.

Not only should fall protection anchors be inspected annually, the structure they are attached to should be inspected on an annual basis to ensure they are safe to use by a qualified person.  A visual inspection should be done on any anchor and attachment method prior to use by the worker.

If you are purchasing a pre-engineered fall protection anchor or fall protection lifeline system ensure whatever you are attaching these fall protection products to is going to withstand the forces incurred during a fall.  The fall protection product you are using may be engineered but is what you are attaching to engineered?

Our Northern Strands Fall Protection Division can design and install fall protection systems.  Plus, complete fall protection rescue plans and fall protection recertification.

Please contact us to learn more about our engineered fall protection systems, services and equipment.

Phone 306-242-7073
Email lifelines@northernstrands.com 
webpage http://northerstrands.com/fall-protection.aspx
or download our brochure below

Northern Strands Fall Protection Brochure email version.pdf (1.4MB)


Northern Strands is proudly Saskatoon Saskatchewan owned and operated.

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Saskatoon (Head Office)

  • 3235 Millar Avenue
  • Saskatoon, SK S7K 5Y3

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  • 125 Henderson Drive
  • Regina, SK S4N 5W4
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